Diabetes management center in South Denver

Diabetes is a chronic condition that can lead to serious complications if not treated properly. However, with the right diagnosis and proper management, patients can lead happy, healthy normal lives.

The Diabetes Management Center at Sky Ridge Medical Center offers exceptional diabetes care to patients throughout Colorado, using individualized treatment plans tailored to specific needs and lifestyles. We work closely with each patient first to properly diagnose his/her condition and then to carefully manage the disease through nutrition, exercise, support and education.

Our diabetes management program includes:

  • Diabetes education
  • Gestational diabetes education
  • Access to a certified diabetes educator
  • Workshops to help you better manage your diabetes
  • Support from others living with diabetes
  • News and access to diabetic education materials
  • Training to help you and your loved ones use diabetic devices
  • Tools to help you live your best life

To contact a diabetes expert at Sky Ridge Medical Center, please call us at (303) 779-9355.

Diabetes accreditation

Diabetes Education Accreditation Program

The Diabetes Management Center at Sky Ridge is accredited through the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), a national organized dedicated to helping those with diabetes live long and healthy lives.

Hospitals that have received AADE accreditation meet or exceed national standards for diabetes self-management education. Their certification indicates that our facility offers high quality, comprehensive and effective education for diabetes patients.

Diabetes management team

The registered dieticians and certified diabetes educators at Sky Ridge are here to help you deal with your diabetes, with comprehensive treatment, including exercise, nutrition education and more.

Registered dietitians

A registered dietitian is a food and nutrition expert who has met the minimum academic and professional requirements to qualify for the credential "RD." In addition to RD credentialing, many states have regulatory laws for dietitians and nutrition practitioners. State requirements frequently are met through the same education and training required to become an RD.

Diabetes educators

A certified diabetes educator (CDE) is a healthcare professional who is specialized and certified to teach people with diabetes and how to help them manage their condition. The CDE is an invaluable asset to those who need to learn the tools and skills necessary to control their blood sugar and avoid long-term complications due to hyperglycemia. CDEs at Sky Ridge also provide emotional support to diabetes patients.

Diabetes education

The Diabetes Management Center at Sky Ridge offers a diabetes education program to teach patients all about diabetes health, how to set goals and how to change unhealthy behaviors. We offer individual sessions with a diabetes educator, or we have group diabetes training classes.

Call for More About Our Diabetes Education Program

The group class is a four-week series of two-hour long sessions, and includes:

  1. Assessment and behavior change session
    Our assessment and behavior change course is three hours and is offered two to three times a week. We cover diabetes assessment, stages of change and how to establish a support system to stay healthy.
  2. Core curriculum
    Our core curriculum class is a four-hour course offered four to five times each month. We cover nutrition, how to monitor blood sugar levels, how to prevent complications, proper exercise and staying healthy with diabetes.
  3. Meal planning
    Our meal planning class is a two-hour class and is offered two to three times each week. We talk about how to create a weekly meal plan, how to stay healthy while dining out and how to read a food label.
  4. Three-month follow-up
    Our three-month follow up class is a one-hour class that is offered one or two times each month. We revisit each patient's behavior change goals and discuss how to maintain a healthy lifestyle with diabetes.
  5. Twelve-month follow-up
    Our twelve-month follow up class is a one-hour class that is offered one or two times a month. We revisit each patient's behavior-change goals, discuss diabetes challenges that may arise and how to access community resources.

Other educational classes we offer:

  • Carbohydrate counting
  • Coping/stress management
  • Exercise
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Insulin pump therapy
  • Weight management

Gestational diabetes education

The Diabetes Management Center at Sky Ridge offers a three-part educational series for expectant mothers with gestational diabetes.

  1. Our first gestational diabetes class is a two-hour class that is offered two or more times weekly. This class includes information about consistent carbohydrate meal planning, how to measure blood glucose with a glucometer, target blood sugar levels (before and after meals), how to keep records for your physician.
  2. Our second gestational diabetes class is a one-hour follow up that is scheduled one or two weeks after the first class. In it, we review blood sugar and meal intake records, and make necessary changes.
  3. Our third and final class is offered postpartum and is designed to help patients take control to reduce her future risk of Type 2 diabetes. This is done through taking on a more active lifestyle, meal planning and weight loss strategies.

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes, affecting nearly 12 million men. Factors that increase your chance for Type 2 diabetes include:

  • Having a family history of Type 2 diabetes
  • Being obese or overweight (especially excess weight in the upper body and abdomen)
  • Eating a lot of meat, especially processed meat (e.g., processed luncheon meats, hot dogs, sausages)
  • Having cholesterol problems (low HDL "good" cholesterol and high triglycerides)
  • Having high blood pressure
  • Having a history of cardiovascular disease
  • Having depression
  • Having a history of gestational diabetes or having a baby that weighs over nine pounds
  • Having an endocrine disorder (Cushing’s syndrome, hyperthyroidism, acromegaly, polycystic ovary syndrome, pheochromocytoma, glucagonoma)
  • Having a condition associated with insulin resistance (e.g., acanthosis nigricans)
  • Having previous blood test results that show impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose
  • Taking certain medicines (e.g., pentamidine, nicotinic acid, glucocorticoids, thiazide)
  • Having a sedentary lifestyle
  • Having sleep difficulties
  • Having a low birth weight
  • Race—African American, Hispanic, Native American, Hispanic American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander
  • Age—45 years or older and younger people who are obese and belong to at risk ethnic groups

Diabetes FAQs

When receiving a diagnosis of diabetes, the amount of information can be overwhelming. The following are some basic answers to frequently asked questions about diabetes.

Diabetes is a chronic (ongoing) disease that occurs in the pancreas. A properly functioning pancreas releases insulin into the blood to help break down sugar and fats. A person with diabetes either does not make insulin, makes too little insulin or the insulin in the body is not working as it should.
There are two types of diabetes—Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes has symptoms that are typically sudden and severe, including blurred vision, dry mouth, excessive thirst, frequent urination, weight loss, weakness and fatigue. Type 2 diabetes can go unnoticed for some time, and may increase in severity over time. They include blurred vision, itchy skin (especially in the groin), yeast infections, dry mouth, excessive thirst, slow healing wounds and frequent urination.
There is no known specific cause of diabetes, but there are certain factors that have been shown to put one person at a higher risk over another. They include:
  • Ethnicity—Native American, Hispanic, African American, Asian American people are often at a higher risk for the disease
  • Family history
  • Weight (those who are overweight are at a higher risk)
  • Age (risk increases with age)
  • Certain medications
  • Pregnancy (pregnancy may cause gestational diabetes, which needs care during the pregnancy, but often resolves after the baby's birth)
There is no known cure for diabetes. However, with proper diagnosis and careful management, this disease can be properly treated and controlled. Most diabetics can live normal, healthy lives. Without proper management, serious complications, such as heart disease, blindness and even infections leading to amputation, can occur.