Introduction

Aloe vera is a plant that is used in gel, cream, and pills. It has been used to help promote healing and ease swelling in skin problems, such as wounds and psoriasis.

Dosages

There are no advised doses for aloe vera.

What Research Shows

May Be Effective

  • Acne —may improve symptoms when used with standard treatmentA1
  • Aphthous stomatitis—may ease symptoms (canker sores) and help with healingB1
  • Burns/wounds—may ease burn and wound pain and help them heal fasterC1-C4
  • Diabetesmay reduce symptoms, lower bad cholesterol, and raise good cholesterol in people with prediabetes and newly diagnosed diabetes who are not receiving standard care yetE1
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)—may reduce symptomsF1
  • Oral lichen planus—may improve symptoms and improve quality of lifeG1-G6
  • Pressure ulcers—may prevent skin sores in those that are on bedrest or sit in one position for long periods of time.H1
  • Psoriasis —may reduce symptomsI1-I2

Unlikely to Be Effective

Editorial process and description of evidence categories can be found at EBSCO NAT Editorial Process.

Editorial process and description of evidence categories can be found at EBSCO NAT Editorial Process.

Safety Notes

It is likely safe to use aloe vera on the skin. It may be safe to take aloe orally for a short time, but abdominal cramps and diarrhea are possible. Not enough studies have been done to say whether it is safe to use for a long period.

Interactions

Talk to your doctor about any supplements or therapy you would like to use. Aloe can interfere with treatment or make conditions worse such as:

  • Aloe is a laxative. It will make food, fluids, or medicine move through your bowels faster. It may make any medicines you take less effective.
  • People with diabetes should talk to their doctors before taking aloe. It may interact with their medicines.

Revision Information

  • Reviewer: EBSCO NAT Review Board Eric Hurwitz, DC
  • Review Date: 03/2019 -
  • Update Date: 03/02/2019 -